Sno Title Type URL Theme Country Abstract Regions Keywords Rank Comments Available in DC
1
FAO. 2005. Increasing the contribution of small-scale fisheries to poverty alleviation and food security. FAO Technical Guidelines for Responsible Fisheries. No. 10. Rome, FAO. 79 pp.
Documents and Reports
ftp://ftp.fao.org/docrep/fao/008/a0237e/a0237e00.pdf
Small-scale fisheries N/a
The objectives of these Technical Guidelines are to provide a focus on small-scale fisheries and their current and potential role in contributing to poverty alleviation and food security by expanding on the guidance on small-scale fisheries offered by the Code. The Guidelines are complementary to existing Technical Guidelines for Responsible Fisheries.
1
No
2
FAO. 2005. Report of the FAO/WorldFish Center Workshop on Interdisciplinary Approaches to the Assessment of Small-Scale Fisheries. Rome, 20–22 September 2005. FAO Fisheries Report. No. 787. Rome, FAO. 44pp.
Documents and Reports
ftp://ftp.fao.org/docrep/fao/008/a0216e/a0216e00.pdf
N/a
The Workshop on Interdisciplinary Approaches to the Assessment of Small-Scale Fisheries (Rome, 20–22 September 2005) was organized jointly by the WorldFish Center and FAO through its FishCode Programme as a first step in developing a collaborative project towards capacity building for small-scale fisheries assessment in developing countries. Participants represented various international and national agencies and academic institutions as well as private firms, and were invited on the basis of their extensive experience in small-scale fisheries either from a natural or social science background.
1
No
3
SEAFDEC. 2006. Supplementary Guidelines on Co-management using Group User Rights, Fishery Statistics, Indicators and Fisheries Refugia, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center, Bangkok, Thailand. 84 p.
Documents and Reports
http://www.seafdec.org/seafdec_n/publication/pub_details.asp?id=54
Legal Issues N/a
The book presents the guidelines into four subdivision: Co-management Using Group User Rights for Small-scale Fisheries; Use of Indicators for the Sustainable Development and Management of Capture Fisheries; Fishery Statistics for Capture Fisheries; and Use of Fisheries Refugia for Capture Fisheries Management. The first three issues are the results of the programs implemented by SEAFDEC, as identified among the priority issues stipulated in the Resolution and Plan of Action of the Millennium Conference held in 2001, while the guidelines for the Use of Fisheries Refugia for Capture Fisheries Management is a concept developed through the project "Reversing Environmental Degradation Trends in South China Sea and Gulf of Thailand" implemented by UNEP-GEF. Though each of the Guidelines has its own introductory parts, efforts are made to summarize the information for the user's of this book.
1
No
4
Johnson, Craig. 2000. Environmental Stress, Economic Risk and Institutional Change: Inshore Fishing and Community-Based Management in Southern Thailand. Presented at "Constituting the Commons: Crafting Sustainable Commons in the New Millenium", the Eighth Conference of the International Association for the Study of Common Property, Bloomington, Indiana, USA, May 31-June 4.
Documents and Reports
http://dlc.dlib.indiana.edu/archive/00000281/
N/a
This paper considers this debate by exploring the conditions under which rural communities in SouthernThailand implemented and enforced rules of restricted access in coastal fishing. Particular emphasis is placed on the ways in which socio-economic differentiation affects the willingness and ability to bear the costs of enforcing and maintaining rules of common property.A principal aim of this paper was to consider the ways in which environmental scarcities affect collective action and institutional change. The findings from Phuket provide evidence to support the notion that resource-dependent communities can institute and enforce rules of common property. In addition, they suggest a relatively strong correlation between environmental degradation and institutional change.
1
No
5
Thompson, Paul M., Islam, Md. Nurul, and Md. Monjur Kadir. 1998. Impact of Government-NGO Initiatives in Community Based Fisheries Management in Bangladesh. Presented at "Crossing Boundaries", the seventh annual conference of the International Association for the Study of Common Property, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, June 10-14.
Documents and Reports
http://dlc.dlib.indiana
N/a
The four million ha of openwaters in Bangladesh are among the world's richest and most complex fisheries. The rivers, beels (lakes), baors (oxbow lakes), haors (large deeply flooded depressions), and floodplains support some 260 fish species (Rahman, 1989) and perhaps some 10 million people earn an income from fish. Several studies, including FAP 16 (1995) and the study reported here, indicate that about 80% of rural households traditionally catch fish or food to sell. Fish contribute about 60% of animal protein consumed (Islam, in press). Studies have shown that the many 'miscellaneous' small fish caught from the floodplains and lakes by poor people, which have been neglected in official statistics and policies, provide relatively more essential nutrients than do the large fish favored by fish culture programs (FAP 16 1995).
1
No
6
Thuon, Try. 2003. Making space and access in fisheries resource management for local communities in Stung treng province. " RCSD’s International Conference on the Politics of the Commons", Cambodia. July 11-14, 2003, Chiang Mai
Documents and Reports
http://dlc.dlib.indiana.edu/archive/00001163/00/Try_Thoun.pdf
N/a
In this article, the author wants to reveal the complex ecology of the upper Mekong in Cambodia as a case study, especially in Stung Treng province where it is considered as the conservation zone in term of fish and biodiversity resource management. That is, the paper aims to investigate the following objectives: (1) to examine the local fishermen's livelihood strategies and their cultural practices and how they adapt themselves to the changing property regimes in the province, (2) to contextualize the policy and fisheries management by the state and to show how such a policy gives right to the changing property relations, (3) to revea ldifferent strategies developed by different actors (including NGOs program related to fishery managementin the province) in gaining access to fisheries management.
1
No
7
Ehsan, Dewan Ali. Community based fisheries management in Bangladesh: Success, conflict and sustainability. Presented in the Workshop "New Developments in Rights-based Fisheries Management: Community Fishing Rights, 29 - 30 August 2005 - University of Southern Denmark - Esbjerg - Denmark".School of Earth,Ocean and Environmental Sciences, University of Plymouth, Plymouth, PL4 8AA, UK
Documents and Reports
http://www.sam.sdu.dk/fame/menu/presentations05.htm
N/a
Fish and Fisheries are the integral parts of riverine Bangladesh. Most of public water bodies are still under open access policy. Recently the Government of Bangladesh is trying to restrict open access by adopting Community Based Fisheries Management (CBFM) techniques. Government has involved NGOs to operate the CBFM as partner of local fisheries groups. Poor fishermen of Bangladesh are getting financial benefits from these projects. However the actual socio-economic benefits are yet to find out. It is also necessary to find out the legal and institutional gaps of CBFM for the future sustainability.
1
No
8
Adhuri, Dedi Supriadi. 2003. Does the sea divide or unite Indonesia?Ethnicity and regionalism from a maritimeperspective. Canberra, Resource Management in Asia-PacificProgram, Research School of Pacific and AsianStudies, The Australian National University,
Documents and Reports
http://dlc.dlib.indiana.edu/archive/00001588/01/rmap_wp48.pdf
N/a
The Indonesian Government argues that the sea bridgesthe many islands and different peoples of Indonesia.Politically, this might be appropriate as a means of encouraging people to think that wherever and whoever there are, they are united as Indonesians. However,when this ideology is used for maritime resource management, it creates problems. One issue derives from the fact that people do not think that the Indonesian sea is 'free for all' Indonesians. This paper argues that people, however vaguely, talk about'we' and 'they' in defining who has the right to aparticular fishing ground and who should be excluded.By analyzing conflicts that have taken part indifferent places in Indonesia, it demonstrates that ethnicity and regionalism have been used as the defining factor of 'We' and 'They.' In particularcontexts, ethnicity and regionalism define whether fishermen can access marine resources. Thus, at the practical level the sea does not unite Indonesians,and it is in fact, ethnicity and regionalism that divides the Indonesian seas.
1
No
9
Coulthard, Sarah. 2006. Adaptation and survival, or conflict and division: Different reactions to a changing common property resource institution in a South Indian fishery. Presented at "Survival of the Commons: Mounting Challenges and New Realities," the Eleventh Conference of the International Association for the Study of Common Property, Bali, Indonesia, June 19-23, 2006.
Documents and Reports
http://dlc.dlib.indiana.edu/archive/00001868/
Traditional Rights N/a
This paper documents a changing CPR management institution and the reactions of the local fishingsociety to those changes.The paper starts with adescription of the Padu system as it operates at Pulicat lake, and its dual role in conflict reduction and sustainable fishing practice. The Padu system at Pulicat lake is caste and gear specific, andhistorically, Padu has included only the traditional fishing caste 'Pattinaver' communities. The thirdpart of the paper illustrates how the Padu system ischanging. Changes in state fisheries policies andglobal markets for prawn export, have affected both fishing behavior, and the breakdown of caste specificity as a determinant to accessing superior fishing grounds. The fourth part of this paper discusses how people are responding to the increasing instability of the Padu system, and the different reactions shown by traditional and non traditional fishers. The paper concludes with some thoughts for management, and a discussion on the future outlookfor the Padu system.
1
No
10
Hilborn, Ray. Orensanz, J.M.(Lobo). Parma, Ana M. Institutions, incentives and the future of fisheries. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B,2005.
Documents and Reports
Resource Allocation N/a
Fisheries around the world are managed with a broad range of institutional structures. Some of these have been quite disastrous, whereas others have proven both biologically and economically successful.Unsuccessful systems have generally involved either open access, attempts at top-down control with poor ability to monitor and implement regulations, or reliance on consensus. Successful systems range from local cooperatives to strong governmental control, to various forms of property rights, but usually involve institutional systems that provide incentives to individual operators that lead to behaviour consistent with conservation.
1
No
11
Grafton, R.Quentin. Social capital and fisheries governance. Ocean and Coastal Management, 2005.
Documents and Reports
Legal Issues N/a
This paper analyzes how social capital influences fisheries governance. Social capital is shown to play a crucial role in promoting trust and co-operation among fishers, and can reduce the 'race to fish'. The effects of bonding, bridging and linking socialcapital are described in terms of six key aspects of fisheries governance and examined in terms of their ability to promote better fisheries management practices. The paper finds that a social capital view of fisheries governance suggests there should be a redirection in priorities and funding away from'top-down' fisheries management towards'co-management' with a focus on engendering rightsand responsibilities for fishers and their communities.
1
No
12
Rajasingam, Mano. Needs Assessment of Fishing Communities in Batticaloa. Sri Lanka, ITDG, 1993.
Documents and Reports
N/a
A report of the study conducted in Batticaloa, to discuss and prioritize participative the real needs of fishing communities. Provides a brief about the current situation, the characteristics of fishing communities, state policy in fishery development and the required statistics.
1
No
13
Astorkiza, Kepa, del Valle, Ikerne, and Immaculada Astorkiza. 2000. "Endure Possibilities of Comanagement in the European Union Fisheries: The Case of Cantabrian Sea Coastal and Artisan Fleet.." Presented at "Constituting the Commons: Crafting Sustainable Commons in the New Millenium", the Eighth Conference of the International Association for the Study of Common Property, Bloomington, Indiana, USA, May 31-June 4.
Documents and Reports
http://dlc.dlib.indiana.edu/archive/00000205/00/astorkiza042400.pdf
N/a
In this paper the case of the Cofradías of Fishermen in the Basque Country has been analysed as that of an institution which has in the past managed common pool fishing resources, although at present we cannot speak of common pool management in its strictest sense, partly because of increasing outside interference. Taking anchovy and albacore fishing as a reference, (since these are the two main target species), the rules for the self-organisation of the Cofradía refer mainly to the maximum amount to be unloaded per vessel per day, the fishing calendar and length of stay at sea. Special mention is due to the restriction imposed on the use of intensive practices such as pelagic trawling gear or mesh drift nets And, by extension, on the type of fleet accepted to work these fishing grounds. In spite of all the restrictions established on anchovy fishing at various levels, the present situation shows signs of overexploitation, overcapacity of the fleet and non-sustainability of resources, because of which the value of present fishing regulations is questioned.
1
No
14
Torell, Magnus. Institutional, Legal and Policy Perspectives on the Management of Aquatic Resources (esp. Fish) and the Aquatic Environment in Wetlands Flood-Plain, Lakes and Rivers in the Mekong River Basin. Presented in the conference "Crossing Boundaries, The Seventh Annual Conference of the International Association for the Study of Common Property, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, June 10-14, 1998.
Documents and Reports
http://dlc.dlib.indiana.edu/archive/00000171/00/torell.pdf
Legal Issues N/a
The paper is prepared and organised keeping in mind that it is one of several papers of a panel addressing a broad range of issues with regards to the Mekong River region and the sustainable use and development of its natural resources and environment.
1
No
15
Macfadyen, G. 2006. Fisheries policy content and direction in Asian APFIC member countries. Poseidon Aquatic Resource Management Ltd.
Documents and Reports
http://www.consult-poseidon.com/reports/Asian%20Policy%20Review%20Final%2005.09.06.doc
Legal Issues N/a
This paper examines trends in fisheries and aquaculture policy in selected countries in Asia. For the countries included in the analysis, policy documents and relevant literature was reviewed and help was sought from fisheries officials/experts in the region, to assess policy status and trends relating to a) the use of development and/or management targets, b) natural resource management issues, c) financial, economic and marketing issues, and d) socio-economic and poverty issues. Some of the specific policy issues examined to see whether they are included in policy documents were: co-management; exploitation of offshore fisheries by local fleets; marine protected areas; subsidies; increases in value-added and exports; poverty reduction; and the use of alternative livelihoods. Individual country information was analysed to generate a regional synthesis of fisheries and aquaculture policy content and direction in the region, and the key drivers for change.
1
No
16
Kuaycharoen, Pornpana. Common property rights regimes: Dynamics of management of freshwater fishery resources in communities of lower Songkhram River basin. Presented in the conference "Politics of the Commons: Articulating Development and Strengthening Local Practices", Chiang Mai, Thailand, July 11-14, 2003.
Documents and Reports
http://dlc.dlib.indiana.edu/archive/00001147/00/Pornpana_Kuaycharoen.pdf
N/a
The study on freshwater fishery resource property in this paper focuses on a transitional process of the property right regime under the influence of the external economic and political changes that affect communities in the lower Songkram river basin in Northeast Thailand as well as the internal cultural factor.
1
No
17
Frazier, Jack. Marine turtles: Whose property? whose rights? Presented in "The Commons in an Age of Global Transition:Challenges, Risks and Opportunities, The Tenth Conference, Oaxaca, Mexico, August 9-13, 2004.
Documents and Reports
http://dlc.dlib.indiana.edu/archive/00001388/00/Frazier_Marine_040531_Paper547b.pdf
N/a
Marine turtles migrate and disperse over vast distances, so an individual may be exposed to numerous human activities in diverse environments, living within the jurisdictions of several sovereign states, as well as on the high seas. Many populations of marine turtles have declined due to a wide diversity of customs and traditions for exploitation and use of turtles and as a result these animals are categorized as endangered. Both national legislation and international instruments afford them protection from exploitation, incidental capture, and other human activities. These are shared resources, and are routinely treated as common property, particularly because marine turtles live in the 'global commons', the high seas. This results in divergent claims for rights to interact -- or to limit the interactions of other stakeholders -- with turtles, especially when consumptive exploitation is involved. Discourses to limit impacts and develop conservation programmes for these reptiles include arguments about protecting ecological roles and ecosystem services, concepts that are often juxtaposed to concerns for supporting marginalized communities, recuperating traditional practices, and asserting cultural/ religious rights.
1
No
18
Jacinto, Eusebio R. Presented in "The Commons in an Age of Global Transition: Challenges, Risks and Opportunities,, The Tenth Conference, Oaxaca, Mexico, August 9-13, 2004."
Documents and Reports
http://dlc.dlib.indiana.edu/archive/00001533/00/Jacinto_Research_040824.pdf
N/a
In the Philippines, small-scale fisheries, as common pool resources, remains beset by the problems of resource degradation and widespread poverty in coastal communities. With the CBCRM movement in the Philippines entering its second generation, there have been both successes and failures. On one hand there have been substantial gains in the area of resource conservation but this stands in stark contrast to assertions of small-scale fishers that they do not benefit economically from their crucial role in coastal resource management. To address this situation, organized fisherfolk and their support organizations are giving added emphasis on livelihood and enterprise initiatives at the community level which means development of value-added fishery products and marketing systems to foster their participation in the national and global economy if they so choose, taking into account the optimal balance between production for local food security and for the market. To deepen the investigation into the situation of small- scale fishers vis-à-vis other economic players at the local, national and global level, value chain analysis will be utilized as a tool from which to develop a framework that can inform both the development of local livelihood and enterprise initiatives and the formulation of appropriate public policy. Value chain analysis would focus on the dynamic of interlinkages in the fishing industry and describe the full range of activities required to bring fishery products from capture/culture, through the different phases of production and delivery to final consumers.
1
No
19
Adhuri, Dedi Supriadi. Does the sea divide or unite Indonesia? Canberra, Resource Management in Asia-Pacific Program, Research School of Pacific and Asian Studies, The Australian National University, 2003. (Series: RMAP Working Paper, no. 48). (Working Paper)
Documents and Reports
http://dlc.dlib.indiana.edu/archive/00001588/01/rmap_wp48.pdf
Traditional Rights N/a
The Indonesian Government argues that the sea bridges the many islands and different peoples of Indonesia. Politically, this might be appropriate as a means of encouraging people to think that wherever and whoever there are, they are united as Indonesians. However, when this ideology is used for maritime resource management, it creates problems. One issue derives from the fact that people do not think that the Indonesian sea is 'free for all' Indonesians. This paper argues that people, however vaguely, talk about 'we' and 'they' in defining who has the right to a particular fishing ground and who should be excluded. By analyzing conflicts that have taken part in different places in Indonesia, it demonstrates that ethnicity and regionalism have been used as the defining factor of 'We' and 'They.' In particular contexts, ethnicity and regionalism define whether fishermen can access marine resources. Thus, at the practical level the sea does not unite Indonesians, and it is in fact, ethnicity and regionalism that divides the Indonesian seas.
1
No
20
Rout, Shyama Prasad. 2006. "Co-Management of Common Property Resources: A Case Study of Supra- National, National and Sub-National Institutions in Fisheries Management around Chilika Lake in Orissa, India.." Presented at "Survival of the Commons: Mounting Challenges and New Realities," the Eleventh Conference of the International Association for the Study of Common Property, Bali, Indonesia, June 19-23, 2006.
Documents and Reports
http://dlc.dlib.indiana.edu/archive/00002008/00/Shyama_Prasad.pdf
Resource Allocation N/a
This paper analyses the role of management institutions on common property resources as development drivers and safety net providers. Particularly, the role of Supra-National, National and Sub-National institutions in fisheries management around Chilika Lake (largest brackish water lagoon in Asia- A Ramsar Site) in Orissa, India will be studied closely. With the intervention of the management institutions there is a visible change in production of fish and shrimp, conservation of ecosystem, livelihood protection of the depending fish folk population, conflict resolution etc. This sort of co-management between the Government and other supportive agencies has not only created a space for development but also has given a platform for the affected population. However, the insights gained into the ongoing struggles, conflicts, negotiation, mediation and adaptations of stakeholders, major learning points are identified to be replicated to the extent to which institutions can be better designed for governing the local commons.
1
No
21
Grafton, R.Quentin. Ocean and Coastal Management, 2005.
Documents and Reports
N/a
This paper analyzes how social capital influences fisheries governance. Social capital is shown to play a crucial role in promoting trust and co-operation among fishers, and can reduce the 'race to fish'. The effects of bonding, bridging and linking social capital are described in terms of six key aspects of fisheries governance and examined in terms of their ability to promote better fisheries management practices. The paper finds that a social capital view of fisheries governance suggests there should be a redirection in priorities and funding away from 'top-down' fisheries management towards 'co-management' with a focus on engendering rights and responsibilities for fishers and their communities.
1
No
22
Hopewell, John. 2004. “When the shore seine is shot, the whole village eats!” The change in shore seine organization in Valinokkam village and the decline of shore seining in southern Ramnad District, Tamil Nadu, India. University of Amsterdam – September 2004.
Documents and Reports
Traditional Rights N/a
This document focuses on the declining practice of shore seining or "padu" system practiced in the fishing village of Valinokkam in Tamil Nadu, India. The reason could be attributed to declining fish stock due to several reasons like use of mechanised boats resulting in overexploitation of the resources, misuse or breakdown of the community based management system (CBMS) due to socio economic or political changes, introduction of new technologies, expansion into market economies, environmental degradation due to natural events like drought and floods as well.
1
No
23
Anuchiracheeva, S. 2000. The Implementation of Fishing-rights Systems in Southeast Asia: a Case Study in Thailand. Presented in "FishRights99 Conference Fremantle, Western Australia 11-19 November 1999. Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations. Rome, 2000.
Documents and Reports
http://www.fao.org/docrep/003/X8985E/x8985e0g.htm#b2-The%20Implementation%20of%20FishingRights%20Systems%20in%20Southeast%20Asia%20a%20Case%20Study%20in%20Thailand%20S.%20Anuchiracheeva
Traditional Rights N/a
This document highlights the prerogatives to make co-management in fisheries successful in South east Asia. Establishment of property rights or fishing rights; co-management concepts and regulations to be integrated in the national fisheries policy and legislation; governmental support by way of decentralisation; control of licences for commercial fisheries; financial support and training to be imparted to local fishermen and active participation by fishermen in matters of planning and implementation in fisheries management activities.
1
No
24
Johnson, Craig. 2000. "Environmental Stress, Economic Risk and Institutional Change: Inshore Fishing and Community-Based Management in Southern Thailand." Presented at "Constituting the Commons: Crafting Sustainable Commons in the New Millenium", the Eighth Conference of the International Association for the Study of Common Property, Bloomington, Indiana, USA, May 31-June 4.
Documents and Reports
http://dlc.dlib.indiana.edu/archive/00000281/00/johnsonc041000.pdf
Traditional Rights N/a
Theoretical propositions about the emergence and evolution of common property regimes suggest that individuals will conserve (or at least manage) natural resources when they believe the risks of maintaining existing relations are unacceptably high. Individuals, it is argued, are more likely to overcome problems of malfeasance and free riding when they share both an interest in the new institutional arrangement and a legacy of successful cooperation. A contradictory proposition argues that individuals will ignore or fail to implement rules of resource conservation when the stakes of survival are most extreme. Implicit here is an assertion that the costs and risks of survival are so great that they preclude participation in all but the most vital forms of social interaction. This paper considers these debates by exploring the conditions under which villagers in Southern Thailand implemented and enforced rules of restricted access in a traditional inshore fishery.
1
No
25
2006. Kolleru judgement. SUPREME COURT OF INDIA
Documents and Reports
Traditional Rights N/a
The judgement held that the rights of the traditional fishermen of Kolleru Lake in Andhra Pradesh, India would not be affected and the fish tanks/bunds that were raised within the sanctuary were illegal since the area is "sanctuary"/"protected area" and hence be demolished.
1
No
26
Fauzi, Akhmad. 2006. Who own the strait?: Conflicting and competing over. Presented in "Sharing the Fish Conference", Australia, 2006. Western Australian Department of Fisheries and FAO, 2006
Documents and Reports
http://www.fish.wa.gov.au/docs/events/ShareFish/papers/pdf/papers/AkhmadFauzi.pdf
Resource Allocation N/a
Lembeh strait in the north Sulawesi is not only home to thousand traditional fishermen whose livelihood dependent upon fishing, but also located within the region’s busiest seaport. The strait also known for its high marine biodiversity and has been an alternative tourist destination beside the famous Bunaken National Park. Determine to protect the marine habitat and high expectation of revenue generation from tourist industry, the local government has decided to allocate part of the strait as a marine protected area or no fishing zone. The decision has sparked controversies over use of and access to resources among user groups in the area. Using economic valuation approach and simple modeling, this paper analyzes the economic impact of various mechanism associated the resource allocation issues as well as policy implication for the local government.
1
No
27
Pearse,Peter H. 2006. Allocation of catches in the Fisheries Sectors: Opportunities for policy development. Presented in "Sharing the Fish conference" Australia 2006". Western Australian Department of Fisheries and FAO.
Documents and Reports
http://www.fish.wa.gov.au/docs/events/ShareFish/papers/pdf/papers/PeterPearse.pdf
Resource Allocation N/a
Traditional methods of allocating the catch among sectors in a fishery are often imprecise, based on vague criteria and insecure. Recent developments in fishing rights, notably individual quotas, have focused attention on these weaknesses and created new pressures for ways to adjust sectoral allocations without undermining the security of established fishers’ rights.The growing and largely favorable experience with individual quotas suggests that market-based mechanisms can be advantageously employed to allocate catch shares among sectors as well. Providing for such mechanisms is most challenging where individual quotas are not employed and sectoral shares are not well defined. Examples of trade in fishing rights across sectors are few but increasing, and can be expected to enhance the benefits of individual quotas. Most important, clearly defined and secure sectoral shares will strengthen the incentives of fishers in all sectors to cooperate in managing their fisheries. To take full responsibility, however, holders of fishing rights must have the means to bargain with fishers in interdependent fisheries, in order to realize maximum benefit from whole marine ecosystems.
1
No
28
Macfadyen, G., Cacaud, P., Kuemlangan, B. 2005. Policy and legislative frameworks for co-management: Background paper for a workshop on mainstreaming fisheries co-management, held in Cambodia, 9th-12th August 2005. Poseidon Aquatic Resource Management Limited. Policy and legislative frameworks for co-management: Background paper for a Regional Workshop on Mainstreaming Fisheries Co-management, held in Cambodia, 9th-12th August 2005
Documents and Reports
http://www.consult-poseidon.com/reports/Poseidon%20Co-management%20Policy%20and%20Legislation%20Report%2012.08.doc
Legal Issues,Co-management N/a
This paper was prepared by Poseidon Aquatic Resource Management Ltd., with the support of FAO Development Law Service (LEGN), to serve as a background paper for a workshop on mainstreaming fisheries co-management, held in Cambodia, 9th-12th August 2005. The paper examines the policy and legislative frameworks for co-management in thirteen countries in Asia and the Pacific, and the extent to which these frameworks hinder or support co-management practices.
1
No
29
Social issues in small-scale fisheries
Documents and Reports
ftp://ftp.fao.org/docrep/fao/meeting/011/j8992e.pdf
Small-scale fisheries N/a
This paper presented at the 27th session of the COFI, argues that more attention should be given to social issues in small-scale fisheries. Fishing communities often lack awareness, opportunity and cohesive social institutions to be able to self-organise, articulate their demands, negotiate with government agencies and actively participate in the planning of their own future. Poverty, vulnerability and low levels of social development compromise the ability of small-scale fishers to adopt responsible fishing practices and participate in co-management and community-based fisheries management regimes. Social development issues can be addressed through various sectoral policies relating to education, health, social insurance and others. A human rights perspective provides an overarching approach to addressing social development which has been widely adopted in the UN system.
1
No
30
Ray Hilborn, Julia K. Parrish & Kate Litle. Fishing rights or fishing wrongs? in Reviews in Fish Biology and Fisheries (2005) 15:191–199
Documents and Reports
http://www.springerlink.com/index/T52031N347114375.pdf
Resource Allocation N/a
Increasing attention is being paid to overfishing and the biological, economic, and social implications of persistent mismanagement of aquatic natural resources. In this chorus of concern, little attention is focused on sustainable fisheries, and the lessons to be learned from management systems that produce these successes. Although there is no one prescription for sustainability, a range of quota-based management tools have been used to eliminate the race for fish, increasing the incentives for long-term investment and efficiency.
1
No
31
FAO. 2005. Report of the FAO/WorldFish Center Workshop on Interdisciplinary Approaches to the Assessment of Small-Scale Fisheries. Rome, 20–22 September 2005. FAO Fisheries Report. No. 787. Rome, FAO. 44pp
books
http://www.fao.org/docrep/009/a0216e/a0216e00.htm
N/a
The Workshop on Interdisciplinary Approaches to the Assessment of Small-Scale
Fisheries (Rome, 20–22 September 2005) was organized jointly by the WorldFish Center and FAO through its FishCode Programme as a first step in developing a collaborative project towards capacity building for small-scale fisheries assessment in developing countries. Participants represented various international and national agencies and academic institutions as well as private firms, and were invited on the basis of their extensive experience in small-scale fisheries either from a natural or social science background.
1
No
32
The state of world highly migratory, straddling and other high seas. Maguire, J.-J.; Sissenwine, M.; Csirke, J.; Grainger, R.; Garcia, S. FAO Fisheries Technical Paper. No. 495. Rome: FAO. 2006. 84p.
Documents and Reports
http://www.fao.org/docrep/009/a0653e/a0653e00.htm
N/a
1
No
33
Fish for the People: A Special Publication for the Promotion of Sustainable Fisheries for Food Security in the ASEAN Region
newsletters
http://download.seafdec.net/index.php?act=category&id=2
N/a
1
No
34
Rashid, Saifur. 2005. Common Property Rights and Indigenous Fishing Knowledge in the Inland Openwater Fisheries of Bangladesh. The Case of the Koibortta Fishing Community of Kishoregonj. Doctor of Philosophy, Curtin University of Technology.
Documents and Reports
http://adt.curtin.edu.au/theses/available/adt-WCU20051213.092754/unrestricted/01Front.pdf
Traditional Rights N/a
This thesis provides a detailed ethnographic account of one community, the Koibortta fishers of Krishnapur village in the northeast flood plain region of Bangladesh, focusing on their management practices and indigenous fishing knowledge in selected inland common property fisheries
1
No
35
Pokrant, Reeves, McGuire, ‘Riparian Rights and the Organisation of Work and Market Relations among the Inland Fishers of Colonial Bengal, c.1793-1950' in Youssouf Ali and Chu-fa Tsai (eds), Openwater Fisheries of Bangladesh (Dhaka: Universities Press and Bangladesh Centre for Advanced Studies, 1996)
Documents and Reports
Traditional Rights N/a
1
No
36
Ahmed, Mahfuzuddin. 2006. Allocation Issues in Marine Environment - Managing Conflicts between Commercial, Artisanal and Tourism in Tropical Fisheries. Sharing the Fish Conference 2006.
Documents and Reports
http://www.fish.wa.gov.au/docs/events/ShareFish/papers/pdf/papers/MahfuzuddinAhmed.pdf
Resource Allocation N/a
Allocation of resource access and use rights is one of the most controversial issues in marine fisheries. Historically, various principles of allocation have evolved along with the objectives of public policies (such as concerns for sustainability), and recognition of different stakeholders in fishing industry. The recognition of exclusive economic zone (EEZ), development of technologies, and emergence of markets for different products, services and uses of fisheries and marine environment provided an overall economic dimension to the allocation issues. Recognition of tourism, recreational fishing, conservation and bio-diversity values of fisheries have greatly influenced the allocation principles in fisheries. As a result, allocation issues in tropical fisheries have become elevated from being concerns for improving and maintaining the welfare and living standards of small isolated fishing communities to a higher level cross-sectoral, national and international development and conservation concerns. This paper examines the conflicts and competition amongst artisanal, commercial and tourism with regard to allocation of marine resources. The effectiveness and limitations of market based allocation principles as well as common property and co-management arrangements to manage resource conflicts are also discussed. Both vertical and horizontal approaches to the management of the industry have been recommended to manage the allocation issues in socially, economically and environmentally sustainable ways.
1
No
37
Bangladesh: Profile of Fisheries
Documents and Reports
Country Profiles N/a
Compiled from various sources, provides a brief overview on various aspects of fisheries in Bangladesh.
1
No
38
John Kurien, So Nam and Mao Sam Onn. Policy Paper: Cambodia’s Aquarian Reforms: The Emerging Challenges for Policy and Research. Inland Fisheries Research and Development Institute. 2006. 32pp
Documents and Reports
http://www.ifredi.org/Documents/publications/phase2/policy/aquarian%20reforms_eng.pdf
Country Profiles,Resource Allocation N/a
1
No
39
Pomeroy, Robert; Kim Anh Thi Nguyen and Ha Xuan Thong. 2009. Small-scale marine fisheries policy in Vietnam. Marine Policy (33): 419-428
Documents and Reports
Fisheries Management N/a
Vietnam's marine fisheries are considered to be small scale and are concentrated in coastal near-shore waters. This has resulted in heavy pressure on near-shore fisheries resources. Near-shore fisheries are considered by fishers and the government to be over-exploited, causing hardship for many coastal communities. This paper reviews and analyzes changes in policy towards small-scale fisheries in Vietnam over the last two decades.
Asia
Small Scale Fisheries,Fisheries Management
5
No
40
Satria, Arif; Yoshiaki Matsuda and Masaaki Sano. 2006. Questioning community based coral reef management systems: Case study of Awig-Awig in Gili Indah, Indonesia. Environment, Development and Sustainability (8): 99-118
Documents and Reports
Traditional Rights N/a
Issues and complexities arising when the fisheries and marine tourism sectors have stakes in an institution governing the coral reefs ecosystem called awig-awig are discussed, awig-awig is a collaquialism meaning ' a local rule'. The community-based management system is commonly recognized as a better approach to governing resources, however, the success of awig-awig in the study area is questionable. Awig-awig fails to deal with the conflict of interest among stakeholders in coastal resource appropriation, despite the community being relatively culturally homogenous.
Asia
Customary Rights,Fisheries Management,Traditional Communities
5
No
41
Kuemlangan, Blaise. 2004. Creating legal space for community-based fisheries and customary marine tenure in the Pacific: Issues and opportunities. FishCode Review 7. Rome, FAO, 2004. 65p.
Documents and Reports
Fisheries Management,Traditional Rights N/a
The legal environment within which community-based fisheries management (CBFM) will function should be examined to determine whether it supports or will need necessary enhancement to support the implementation of CBFM. The question as to whether CBFM is legally sustainable must be asked with regard to the whole legal framework of the State – from fundamental laws, such as the constitution, to subsidiary legislation. Amendments to existing legislation or new legislation may be necessary to implement CBFM. There is no blueprint for a CBFM legal framework what number of rights with respect to fish resources should be accorded and what should be the level of participation by the local community. It is important, however, to ensure that the constitutionality of all these aspects is ascertained, and to ensure that enabling legislation for CBFM consider the following issues: security, exclusivity and permanence of rights vested; flexibility of its provisions so as to allow states to exercise choices that reflect their unique needs, conditions and aspirations for CBFM; and the way CBFM harmonizes with the overall fisheries management legal framework. Attaining the right balance in the CBFM legal framework, however, is difficult and depends largely on local circumstances.
Oceania
Customary Rights,Legal Issues,Fisheries Management
5
No
42
Cinner, Joshua. 2005. Socioeconomic factors influencing customary marine tenure in the Indo-Pacific. Ecology and Society 10 (1): 36
newsletters
http://www.ecologyandsociety.org/vol10/iss1/art36/
Traditional Rights N/a
This paper examines the social and economic characteristics of 21 coastal communities in Papua New Guinea and Indonesia, and explores the characteristics of the communities that employ exclusive marine tenure to answer the following questions: Which socioeconomic factors are related to the presence of CMT regimes? How might socioeconomic factors influence the ability of communities to employ or maintain CMT regimes? Distance to market, immigration, dependence on fishing, and conflicts were found to be related to the presence of highly exclusive marine tenure systems. Exploring these relationships will help conservation practitioners better understand how future social changes may influence the foundation of conservation and development projects.
Oceania
Customary Rights,Traditional Communities,Conservation
5
No
43
Hidayat, Ir. Aceng. Property right changes of coral reef management: From a State property regimes towards a sustainable local governance: Lessons from Gili Indah village, West Lombok, Indonesia
newsletters
http://dlc.dlib.indiana.edu/archive/00001919/
Traditional Rights N/a
This paper is to explain a case of change of property right regime of coral reef management: from an open access to state property and then to local governance, a case study of Gili Indah West Lombok, Indonesia. It demonstrates the reasons of the change, the ineffectiveness of state property regime, and the emergence of local governance where conflicts are assumed as the triggering factors. The study found out that conflict of interest between two main stakeholders: tourism business operators (TBOs) and fishermen drove the change process. The conflicts initially emerged after Balai Konservasi Sumberdaya Alam (BKSDA) as the executor of the state property regimes was unable to protect the coral reef ecosystems from destructive fishing practice. It has also failed in halting Muroami application that has triggered lasting conflicts between TBOs and fishermen. The failure of the state property regime has led TBOs to take over the protection tasks through constructing local governance. So far, the local governance has been successful in protecting the coral reef resources and forced the users to use the coral reefs in a sustainable manner.
Asia
Customary Rights,Traditional Communities,Fisheries Management
4
No
44
Liese, Christopher, Martin D. Smith, and Randall. A. Kramer. 2007. Open access in a spatially delineated artisanal fishery: the case of Minahasa, Indonesia. Environment and Development Economics 12: 123-143.
newsletters
Traditional Rights N/a
The effects of economic development on the exploitation of renewable resources are investigated in settings where property rights are ill-defined or not enforced.This paper explores potential conservation implications from labor and product market developments, such as enhanced transportation infrastructure. A model is developed that predicts individual fish catch per unit effort based on characteristics of individual fishermen and the development status of their villages. The econometric model is estimated using data from across sectional household survey of artisanal coral reeffishermen in Minahasa,Indonesia, taking account of fishermen heterogeneity.Variation across different villages and across fishermen within the villages is used to explore the effects of development.
Asia
Fisheries Management
3
No
45
Adhuri, Dedi Supriadi. The incident in Dullah Laut: Marine tenure and the politics in village leadership in Maluku, Eastern Indonesia.
newsletters
Traditional Rights N/a
The marine resource management discourses limits its concern for property rights to their role as instruments of resource management. Through the analysis of a conflict over communal marine tenure at Dullah Laut village in Maluku, Eastern Indonesia, this paper highlights the socio-political and economic values of communal marine tenure. It argues that communal marine tenure in Dullah Laut village is not considered merely as an instrument for controlling marine territory and resources but also as a form of 'political capital'.
Asia
Property rights,Fisheries Management
3
No
46
Adhuri, Dedi Supriadi. 2003. Does the sea divide or unite Indonesians? Ethnicity and regionalism from a maritime perspective. Resource management in Asia-Pacific working paper. No. 48. Resource Management in Asia-Pacific Program. Research school of Pacific and Asian studies. The Australian National University. Canberra
Documents and Reports
Traditional Rights N/a
The Indonesian Government argues that the sea bridges the many islands and different peoples of Indonesia. Politically, this might be appropriate as a means of encouraging people to think that wherever and whoever there are, they are united as Indonesians. However, when this ideology is used for maritime resource management, it creates problems. One issue derives from the fact that people do not think that the Indonesian sea is ‘free for all’ Indonesians. This paper argues that people, however vaguely, talk about ‘we’ and ‘they’ in defining who has the right to a particular fishing ground and who should be excluded. By analyzing conflicts that have taken part in different places in Indonesia, it demonstrates that ethnicity and regionalism have been used as the defining factor of ‘We’ and ‘They.’ In particular contexts, ethnicity and regionalism define whether fishermen can access marine resources. Thus, at the practical level the sea does not unite Indonesians, and it is in fact, ethnicity and regionalism that divides the Indonesian seas.
Asia
Traditional Fishing,Fisheries Management
3
No
47
Wasinrapee, Puree. 2006. The Moken: Today and tomorrow - building a sustainable livelihood for the Moken community in Surin Islands Marine National Park. Submiited as Master's Thesis to the Department of Environment, Technology and Social Studies. Roskilde University.
Documents and Reports
Traditional Rights N/a
The thesis seeks to explain the feasibility of the tourism activities proposed by the Andaman Pilot Project (APP) for the Moken living in the Surin Island Marine National Park (SP). The Moken, who are a group of indigenous sea nomads who used to wander around the area in the past, has undergone enormous changes in their life – from sea wandering to permanent settlement in a protected area.

The case study investigation in the Moken village has examined the adaptability of the Moken whether they can cope with a range of changes that take place in the community as a result of tourism on the SP and the implementation of the tourism activities proposed by the APP. In addition, the study has also examined the feasibility of the tourism activities whether they can establish the Moken a sustainable livelihood. This examination has focused on one hand on the institutional constraints that may obstruct the implementation of the tourism activities and on the sustainability of the project on the other.
Asia
Traditional Communities,Conservation
3
No
48
Arunotai, Narumon. 2006. Moken traditional knowledge: an unrecognized form of natural resources management and conservation. International Social Science Journal, Volume 58, Number 187. 139-150.
newsletters
Traditional Rights N/a
This article presents the traditional knowledge of an ethnic group of sea nomads generally known in Thailand as Chao Lay. The Moken once led a nomadic marine life. They have developed their traditional knowledge and belief system over several centuries. This practical knowledge has been obtained through interaction with local ecosystems and from observation and experimentation in everyday life. The Moken have intimate knowledge relating to the sea and the forest, and they have elaborated boat-building skills and other technologies that allow them to make their living from the sea, coastal areas, and islands. This traditional knowledge and attendant practices represent a form of natural resources management and conservation. It comprises: 1) knowledge and skills that depend upon simple technologies that have minimal impact on the natural environment and its resources; 2) a nomadic life with frequent displacements that allow the Moken to rotate their foraging grounds and prevent overuse and degradation of specific areas; 3) knowledge about numerous forest and marine species - their characteristics, behaviour, habitats and eco-niches - which enables the Moken to make use of a diversity of local ecosystems; 4) a hunter-gatherer livelihood focusing primarily upon subsistence, with little accumulation of material goods, and finally 5) a philosophy and belief system that holds that natural resources are not individually owned, but rather are to be shared by everyone without restrictions on access.
Asia
Traditional Communities,Traditional Knowledge,Conservation
4
No
49
Pomeroy, Robert. 1995. Community-based and co-management institutions for sustainable coastal fisheries management in Southeast Asia. Ocean & Coastal Management 27 (3): 143-162
newsletters
Fisheries Management N/a
Fisheries experts now recognize that resource conflicts can be diminished and resources better managed when fishers and other resource stakeholders are more involved in management, and access rights are distributed more effectively and equitably. There is an increasing commitment by governments in Southeast Asia to policies and programs of decentralization and community-based management and co-management. The planning and implementation of these management systems will require the development of new legal, administrative and institutional arrangements at both national and community levels to complement contemporary political, economic, social and cultural structures.
Asia
Fisheries Management,Community Based Management
4
No
50
Ruddle, Kenneth. 1998. Traditional community-based coastal marine fisheries management in Viet Nam. Ocean & Coastal Management 40 : 1-22
newsletters
Traditional Rights N/a
Despite more than a century of colonial occupation, radical political and administrative change, and more recent motorization of fleets and gear introductions, there remains in Viet Nam a still functioning tradition of local stakeholder organizations (van chai) by which marine fishing communities historically regulated the fishery and ensured mutual assistance for their membership. Such systems remain strong in many coastal communities, especially in the Central and Southern regions, largely because their moral authority and leadership is deeply rooted in and legitimated by traditional religion, expressed in the community 'whale' shrine. In 1963, one such community organization, in Binh Thuan Province of the Central Region, comprehensively documented its traditional regulations to inform future generations. This paper analyzes that document, supplemented and complemented by information from seven other marine fisheries van chai in the Central and Southern regions.
Asia
Customary Rights,Fisheries Management
5
No